Difference between revisions of "Science fiction"

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'''Science fiction''' often shortened to '''sci-fi''' is a theme in various forms of fiction which use concepts that seem scientific, but are not real. This is a major grouping of fiction and is often contrasted with [[fantasy]].
 
'''Science fiction''' often shortened to '''sci-fi''' is a theme in various forms of fiction which use concepts that seem scientific, but are not real. This is a major grouping of fiction and is often contrasted with [[fantasy]].
  
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==Personal==
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I was exposed to science fiction at a very young age with films like ''[[Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back]]'', ''[[Tron]]'', and ''[[Dune (film)|Dune]]''. This got me acclimated to sci-fi and I continued to enjoy it as I got older with ''[[Star Trek: The Next Generation]]'' and many others. As I got more into books in my late 20s and early 30s, I began reading many of the best loved sci-fi titles. One of the things I especially love about sci-fi is that it frequently delves into philosophical [[thought experiments]] and issues with sociology and depicts them in a way the general public can understand. For example, the ''Star Trek: TNG'' episode "The Outcast" which was shown on network television in 1992, pretty transparently deals with [[transgender|transgenderism]] and [[conversion torture]].
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==Works==
 
* [[:Category:Science Fiction|Science Fiction Category]]
 
* [[:Category:Science Fiction|Science Fiction Category]]
  

Latest revision as of 16:58, 28 September 2020

Science fiction often shortened to sci-fi is a theme in various forms of fiction which use concepts that seem scientific, but are not real. This is a major grouping of fiction and is often contrasted with fantasy.

Personal

I was exposed to science fiction at a very young age with films like Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, Tron, and Dune. This got me acclimated to sci-fi and I continued to enjoy it as I got older with Star Trek: The Next Generation and many others. As I got more into books in my late 20s and early 30s, I began reading many of the best loved sci-fi titles. One of the things I especially love about sci-fi is that it frequently delves into philosophical thought experiments and issues with sociology and depicts them in a way the general public can understand. For example, the Star Trek: TNG episode "The Outcast" which was shown on network television in 1992, pretty transparently deals with transgenderism and conversion torture.

Works

Media

Links

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