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Spiders

Humans tend to have an instinctual fear of spiders, but no one is really sure why. Is it the eight legs? The hairy bodies? The creepy crawling movements? Whatever it is, most people will get all squeamish if a spider were to crawl on them. Chances are that even looking at the pictures of spiders on this page will make you uncomfortable. Appearance aside, there is one legitimate reason to have a fear of spiders; they can kill you.

The brown recluse spider, for example, contains a dermonecrotic venom that will rapidly rot human tissue and can be fatal if left untreated. The damage can be so bad that the bite victim may need to have skin grafts to repair the affected tissue.

The Australasian funnel-web spider is another spider that has a venom toxic enough to kill people. And you'll certainly know it when you're bit because a funnel-web has fangs long enough and powerful enough to penetrate a human fingernail.

The most notorious spider in North America is the black widow. Although there are plenty of deadly widow spiders all over the world, the black widow has become the most famous. Their bite contains a neurotoxic venom which will cause the muscles of those bitten to involuntarily contract causing severe pain and possibly death. In the species of widow spiders the females are much larger and have much more venom. Also, during mating a female will sometime kill and eat the male, hence the name widow.

None of these spiders ranks up to the most deadly spider in the world, which is the Brazilian wandering spider. While its venom may not be as potent as some of the others, the wandering spider ends up being responsible for more deaths than the others (at least five people every year). The reason they cause so many deaths is because of how they feed. Most spiders spin webs or live in a den, but the wandering spider, as its name suggest, wanders around on the ground searching for prey. During they day they seek dark places to hide, which means houses, sheds, shoes, under children's toys, etc. This habit of theirs means a great deal more accidental encounters that can quickly turn into accidental deaths.

Their natural creepiness alone has allowed spiders to become symbols of Halloween, but we mustn't forget their influence in popular culture that helps keep them that way. Movies like The Giant Spider Invasion, Arachnophobia, and Eight Legged Freaks have kept their reputation as frightening creatures of the dark alive and well.

Have fun playing with a creepy digital spider.